#queerwriters

Undisciplining the Fields, Ronaldo V. Wilson with Tonya M. Foster in conversation

  • NOTE: WEBINAR BROADCAST ABANDONED, USE LIVESTREAM LINK BELOW
  • Program also available via live-stream and at the same link after the event.
  • Masks are requested for those attending in person

Undisciplining the Fields: Study, Performance, and (Re:)Creation

Undisiciplining the Fields is a new conversation, reading (and sometimes performance) series that will invite writers, artists, filmmakers, and scholars from a range of fields to discuss and share their cross-disciplinary practices and thinking. Initiated by George and Judy Marcus Chair in Poetry Tonya M. Foster, in collaboration with The Poetry Center, the series is envisioned as an unruly exploration of the ways that practice expertise is developed and encouraged through interest, study, and accident; and of the ways that creativity motivates / instigates investigations of the possible. Foster's guest for this premier iteration of Undisciplining the Fields is Ronaldo V. Wilson, whose body of work in writing and drawing, movement and performance, will serve as the starting point for these two Black artists' improvised and intensified, focusing and generative colloquy. Please join us.

Ronaldo V. Wilson, PhD, is the author of Narrative of the Life of the Brown Boy and the White Man (University of Pittsburgh, 2008), winner of the 2007 Cave Canem Prize., Poems of the Black Object (Futurepoem Books, 2009), winner of the Thom Gunn Award for Gay Poetry and the Asian American Literary Award in Poetry in 2010.  His latest books are Farther Traveler: Poetry, Prose, Other (Counterpath Press, 2015), finalist for a Thom Gunn Award for Gay Poetry and Lucy 72 (1913 Press, 2018). Co-founder, with poets Dawn Lundy Martin and Duriel E. Harris, of the Black Took Collective, Wilson is also a mixed media artist, dancer and performer. Wilson is Associate Professor of Creative Writing and Literature at U.C. Santa Cruz, serving on the core faculty of the Creative Critical PhD Program, and co-directing the Creative Writing Program.

  • In her review of Narrative of the Life of the Brown Boy and the White ManClaudia Rankine writes, “Ronaldo V. Wilson’s prose poems are alternately tough and tender probes into the underbelly of their psyches. With audacity and wit reminiscent of the work of Hilton Als, bell hooks, Frantz Fanon, and James Baldwin, Wilson decodes sociopolitical narratives around race, sexuality, and class. Identity, Wilson seems to say, is only a collection of stories—the ones told about us in battle with the ones we tell ourselves. What we have here is palpable consciousness: a stunning achievement.”

Tonya M. Foster, the George and Judy Marcus Endowed Chair in Poetry at San Francisco State University, is the author of the poetry collection A Swarm of Bees in High Court (Belladonna*, 2015) and the bilingual poetry chapbook La grammaire des os (joca seria, 2016). She is coeditor of the essay collection Third Mind: Creative Writing through Visual Art (Teachers & Writers Collaborative, 2002). Forthcoming are a poetry chapbook, A History of the Bitch (AHOTB) (Sputnik & Fizzle), and the full-length collection Thingification (Ugly Duckling Presse). With the support of a Creative Capital Award, Foster is also developing a multimedia, multi-genre project titled Monkey Talk, that studies issues of race, paranoia, surveillance, and aesthetics.

Video:

Ronaldo V. Wilson in conversation and reading with Angel Dominguez for The Poetry Center, October 16, 2021

Tonya M. Foster’s Harvard Ratcliffe Institute 2021 Fellow presentation, “AHOTB

Mazza Writer in Residence Ari Banias and Brandon Som, at Medicine for Nightmares

  • This program also available via live-stream and at the same link after the event.
     
  • Masks are required for those attending in person.

Co-presented by The Poetry Center and Medicine for Nightmares.

Ari Banias is the author of A Symmetry (2021), winner of the 2021 Publishing Triangle Award for Trans & Gender Variant Literature, and Anybody (2016), both from W. W. Norton. Recent poems have appeared in bæst, Georgia Review, Hyperallergic, The Nation, The New Republic, Triple Canopy, Verse, Washington Square, and The Yale Review. He is the recipient of numerous fellowships and residencies including at Yaddo, Headlands Center for the Arts, MacDowell, the New York Foundation for the Arts, and the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown. Currently, Ari lives in Chicago. aribanias.com

Brandon Som is the author of The Tribute Horse (Nightboat Books), winner of the 2015 Kate Tufts Discovery Award, and the chapbook Babel's Moon (Tupelo Press). His new book Tripas is forthcoming with the University of Georgia Press in 2023. He lives on the unceded land of the Kumeyaay Nation and teaches literature and creative writing at the University of California San Diego. 

Related event: Ari Banias and Demian DinéYazhi', at Beyond Binary

Mazza Writer in Residence Ari Banias and Demian Dinéyazhi’, at Beyond Binary

  • This program also available via live-stream and at the same link after the event.
     
  • Masks are requested for those attending in person.

Co-presented by The Poetry Center and Fine Arts Gallery, SF State. 

In conjunction with the exhibition Beyond Binary, The Poetry Center's Mazza Writer in Residence for Fall 2022, poet Ari Banias, is joined by poet and artist (and contributor to the exhibition) Demian Dinéyazhi’. They'll each read from their poems and engage in conversation with the audience. The exhibition runs from September 17 through October 27, with this event being one of several public programs taking place in the space of the gallery amid the twenty contributing artists' works. More here.

Ari Banias is the author of A Symmetry (2021), winner of the 2021 Publishing Triangle Award for Trans & Gender Variant Literature, and Anybody (2016), both from W. W. Norton. Recent poems have appeared in bæst, Georgia Review, Hyperallergic, The Nation, The New Republic, Triple Canopy, Verse, Washington Square, and The Yale Review. He is the recipient of numerous fellowships and residencies including at Yaddo, Headlands Center for the Arts, MacDowell, the New York Foundation for the Arts, and the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown. Currently, Ari lives in Chicago. aribanias.com

Demian DinéYazhi ́ is a Portland-based Diné transdisciplinary artist, poet, and curator born to the clans Naasht’ézhí Tábąąhá (Zuni Clan Water’s Edge) & Tódích’íí’nii (Bitter Water). Their practice is a regurgitation of purported Decolonial praxis informed by the over accumulation and exploitative supremacist nature of hetero-cis-gendered communities post colonization. DinéYazhi´'s praxis interrogates normative spaces by refusing to settle or perform for exploitative galleries and publishers that act as gatekeepers to the lethargic, toxic legacy of Western paradigms. They are a survivor of attempted european genocide, forced assimilation, manipulation, sexual and gender violence, capitalist sabotage, and hypermarginalization in a colonized country that refuses to center their politics and philosophies around the Indigenous Peoples whose Land they occupy and refuse to give back. They live and work in a post-post-apocalyptic world unafraid to fail. @heterogeneoushomosexual

Related event: Ari Banias and Brandon Som, at Medicine for Nightmares

Aaron Shurin and Robert Glück, 75th birthday reading & celebration

  • This program also available via live-stream and at the same link after the event.
     
  • Masks are required for those attending in person.

Co-presented by The Poetry Center and The Green Arcade, with thanks to our generous host, McRoskey Mattress Co

Our friends and fellow poets Aaron Shurin and Robert Glück each turn 75 this year, and we're putting on a little celebratory reading and evening in their honor. Both are also alums of The Poetry Center, and have been teachers and mentors to dozens of younger poets and writers across the years. Please join us to celebrate their collective anniversary. 

Aaron Shurin is the author of fourteen books of poetry and prose, most recently The Blue Absolute (Nightboat, 2020), Flowers & Sky: Two Talks (Entre Rios Books, 2017), and The Skin of Meaning: Collected Literary Essays and Talks (University of Michigan Press, 2015). A pioneer in both LGBTQ studies and innovative verse, Shurin was a member of the original Good Gay Poets collective in Boston, and later the first graduate of the storied Poetics Program at New College of California. He has written numerous critical essays about poetic theory and compositional practice, as well as personal narratives on sexual identity, gender fluidity, and the AIDS epidemic. He is the former Associate Director of the Poetry Center at SFSU. A longtime educator, he’s the former director and currently Professor Emeritus for the MFA Writing Program at the University of San Francisco.

Robert Glück’s poetry collections include Reader; La Fontaine, a collaboration with Bruce Boone; In Commemoration of the Visit, a collaboration with Kathleen Fraser; and Parables, a collaboration with the Cuban artist, José Angel Toirac. Roof Books will publish Glück’s long poem, I, Boombox, in 2023. His fiction includes the story collections Denny Smith and Elements, and the novels Jack the Modernist and Margery Kempe, which was republished in 2020 by NYRB Classics. An excerpt from his latest novel, About Ed, appeared this summer in The Paris Review. Glück edited, with Camille Roy, Mary Berger, and Gail Scott, the anthology Biting The Error: Writers Explore Narrative, and his collected essays, Communal Nude, was published by Semiotext(e) in 2016. Glück served as director of San Francisco State’s The Poetry Center, co-director of Small Press Traffic Literary Center, and associate editor at Lapis Press. He lives in San Francisco. 

Etel Adnan, a Memorial Tribute: with Zaina Alsous, David Buuck, Naz Cuguoğlu, Fady Joudah, Stefania Pandolfo, Camille Roy

  • This program also available via live-stream and at the same link after the event.

Presented by The Poetry Center in conjunction with the Tripwire Cross-Cultural Poetics Series

RSVP TO ATTEND IN PERSON

Please join us for The Poetry Center's memorial tribute to our beloved friend and teacher, Etel Adnan. We'll gather in person, with six guest artists, poets and writers, both those who knew Etel personally and others influenced by her life and work. Audience can attend either in person (limited to 50, RSVP required) or watch via live-stream. Featured participants: Zaina Alsous, David Buuck, Naz Cuguoğlu, Fady Joudah, Stefania Pandolfo, and Camille Roy. Presented in conjunction with the Tripwire Cross-Cultural Poetics Series.

  • Please note: proof of vaccination and mask are required in order to attend in person.

Etel Adnan (1925–2021) was born and raised in Beirut, Lebanon. Her mother was a Greek from Smyrna, her father a high ranking Ottoman officer born in Damascus. In Lebanon, she was educated in French schools. She studied philosophy at the Sorbonne, in Paris, following World War II. In January 1955 she went to the United States to pursue post-graduate studies in philosophy at U.C. Berkeley, and Harvard. From 1958 to 1972, she taught philosophy at Dominican College of San Rafael, California. 

In 1972, she moved back to Beirut and worked as cultural editor for two daily newspapers—first for Al Safa, then for L’Orient le Jour. She stayed in Lebanon until 1976. In 1977, her novel Sitt Marie-Rose was published in Paris, and won the France-Pays Arabes award. This novel has been translated into more than 10 languages, and was to have an immense influence, becoming a classic of war literature. 

In 1977, Adnan, together with her life-partner, Simone Fattal, artist and publisher of The Post-Apollo Press, re-established herself in California, making Sausalito her home, with frequent stays in Paris.

Some twenty books of her poetry, fiction, and essays were published during Adnan's lifetime, garnering multiple awards, including the Griffin International Poetry Prize, 2020, for Time (shared with translator Sarah Riggs). In 2014, To look at the sea is to become what one is: An Etel Adnan Reader, in two large volumes edited by Brandon Shimoda and Thom Donovan, was published by Nightboat Books. That year, she was awarded the Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, France’s highest cultural honor.

In the later years of her life, Etel Adnan was embraced internationally by the art world, with numerous exhibitions of her paintings, work for textiles, prints, and unique hand-painted books, many interviews and features in international art media, and multiple catalogs and monographs devoted to her art. The exhibition "Etel Adnan: Light's New Measure" gathered her work at the Guggenheim Museum in New York in winter 2021–22.
(Adapted, with additions, from the biography at eteladnan.com)

Photo: Etel Adnan by Norma Cole, 19 June 2011, at Irving Petlin exhibition, Éspace topographie de l'art, Paris.

Etel Adnan, interview with Lisa Robertson, BOMB, April 1, 2014

Etel Adnan at home, talking on painting and writing with Judith Benhamou-Huet

Etel Adnan, New York Times obituary, by Nana Asfour, Nov 14, 2021

Etel Adnan, ArtNews obituary, by Tessa Solomon, Nov 15, 2021

The Art World's Tainted Love for "Discovering" Artists: the Case of Etel Adnan, by Naz Cuguoğlu, Hyperallergic, March 6, 2022

The Mountain at the Center: Reflections on Etel Adnan, Small Press Traffic, Feb. 27, 2022

Tripwire: A Journal of Poetics

New Voice Series, featuring Raul Ruiz, with Zêdan Xelef, Alexiz Angel Romero, and Bianca White

  • This program also available via live-stream and at the same link after the event.

The Poetry Center presents the New Voice Series, in its second annual iteration. The series features a poet alum of SF State, in combination with a current SF State Creative Writing graduate student poet, and (this year) two undergraduate student poets at SF State, to each read their work and engage in conversation. Participants in the series are selected by Poetry Center student staff. For this year's event, Raul Ruiz will appear as featured poet, along with Zêdan Xelef, Alexiz Angel Romero, and Bianca White. Please join us!

  • Please note: proof of vaccination and mask are required in order to attend in person.
  • And then one day we decided we weren’t children anymore, we decided we weren’t going to drag our lives across this country of fences to live out the heartbreaking demands of walls. We weren’t going to become men, weren’t going to wake up in the burning mouth of last night’s whiskeys for the rest of our yellow days like our fathers and the broken guns before them. We weren’t going to wait until our dust forgave us in death to touch with eager hands our wings. We weren’t going to forget the piano part of our bodies, the part of us every flower touched when we slept, the corner of our hearts more secret than poems (do you think you’ve ever held a poem in your hand? Prove it. Prove it with the eager shadow of your shadow)
    —Raul Ruiz

Raul Ruiz is a Spanish interpreter who lives and works in San Francisco. An MFA graduate of SF State (2015), Ruiz has a chapbook titled Mustard forthcoming in 2022 from Drop Leaf Press.

Zêdan Xelef is a poet, translator, and cultural preservationist from Mesopotamia. His poems and translations have appeared in Poetry, Los Angeles Review of Books, Words Without Borders, World Literature Today, Tripwire Journal, Asymptote, Epiphany, and Plume, among others. His translation of Selim Temo's Selected Poems from Kurmanji, in collaboration with Alana Marie Levinson-LaBrosse, comes out from Pinsapo Press in Fall 2022. He attends the MFA program at San Francisco State University. 

Alexiz Angel Romero is a queer, gender-nonconforming, Latinx poet from Oxnard, CA, studying for their BS in Chemistry and minor in Queer Ethnic Studies at San Francisco State University

Bianca White is currently a Creative Writing and Liberal Studies major at SFSU. She lives in the East Bay with her mom and sisters. Her poem "Now that I'm Blooming: Things I Hope to Learn" can be found in Transfer Magazine Issue 122. You’ll find her drinking boba milk tea and writing more poetry!

Krip-Hop Nation: featuring Toni Hickman, Keith Jones, Leroy F. Moore Jr., DJ Quad, Wheelchair Sports Camp

Co-presented with the Paul K. Longmore Institute on Disability

With Dawn-Elissa Fischer, moderator

  • ASL and CART will be provided. For any other access concerns, please email Emily Beitiks at beitiks@sfsu.edu.

One of many events taking place beginning March 2022 in conjunction with the Poetry Coalition, under the collective heading “The future lives in our bodies*: Poetry & Disability Justice,” with thanks to The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and Ford Foundation for support of Poetry Coalition programming. Dr. Dawn-Elissa Fischer, who writes and consults about popular culture, policy and political activism with a focus on antiracism, social media and education in a global context, will kindly join the program as moderator (more here). 

Krip-Hop Nation is a worldwide association of artists with disabilities. Founded in 2007 by Leroy F. Moore Jr. in Berkeley, California, the Movement campaigns for equality for people with disabilities worldwide with concerts, tours, workshops and much more. In 2020, four Krip-Hop Nation artists received Emmy Award accolades for Outstanding Music Direction on the Paralympic documentary film Rising Phoenix

In addition to Leroy F. Moore Jr. and co-founder Keith Jones, this event presents three other outstanding artists affiliated with Krip-Hop Nation — Toni Hickman, DJ Quad, and Wheelchair Sports Camp — joining in performance and conversation. 

  • "It is important to us to be seen as artists and musicians who do their thing seriously, purposefully and professionally. We want to show, that a person with a disability also has the right to equal opportunities, that nobody has to hide, that a person with a disability can also discover their talents, promote them and live them out and thus be a valuable part of society. According to our understanding of inclusion, this is exactly what this means: that the focus is on people with their skills and abilities, not their disabilities. We do not want pity, we want consideration, equality, respect and recognition to the same extent that every physically and mentally healthy person enjoys them."
    —from the Krip-Hop Nation website

Bios

Leroy F. Moore Jr., 2021 Emmy award winner, is founder of Krip-Hop Nation and a newly-announced United States Artists 2022 Fellow. Since the 1990s, Moore has been a key member of Poor Magazine, starting with the column “Illin-N-Chillin” and then as founding member of the magazine’s school, the Homefulness and Decolonize Academy. Moore is also a founding member of the National Black Disability Coalition and an activist around police brutality against people with disabilities, and has started and helped start organizations including Disability Advocates of Minorities Organization and Sins Invalid. His cultural work includes film documentary Where Is Hope, Police Brutality Against People with Disabilities, spoken-word CDs, poetry books and the children’s book Black Disabled Art History 101, published by Xochitl Justice Press.

Keith Jones is the President and CEO of SoulTouchin’ Experiences LLC, an organization aimed at bringing a perspective to the issues of access inclusion and empowerment, which affect him as well as others who are persons with and without disabilities. The issues he tackles are wide ranging, from immigration, criminal justice reform, and health care to environmental justice. Paralleling his policy and social justice work, Mr. Jones is a multi-talented artist who along with Leroy Moore and Rob Temple co-founded Krip-Hop Nation, currently celebrating 13 years with the recent Emmy Award winning success of their title song for the Netflix documentary of the Paralympic Games, Rising Phoenix and its acclaimed soundtrack. 

Combining humor, playfulness, radical political perspectives, compassion and undeniable musical chops, Wheelchair Sports Camp is Denver's biggest smallest band. Fronted by the wheelchair using, rap heavy, beat-making, freedom fighting producer, educator, foul mouthed, queer rebel rouser Kalyn, the band is a combination of live and electronic instruments with a more noisy, jazzy, experimental, combination to the traditional hip-hop group. Raised by the DIY (Do It Yourself) spirit of experimental independence, the band has since relied on interdependence in order to stretch into theatre, performance art, public television, politics, prison tours, permanent installations, and more to come. The vinyl release of All Is Wonder will be in print soon. More here.

Jesse DJ Quad Morin is a disabled hip hop artist who became paralyzed at the age of 16 from a diving accident at Venice Beach in July of 1984. Once he started getting into DJing he would practice to perfect his craft, still not having full function of his arms and hands. As a producer/beat maker DJ Quad started a hip hop crew called 5th Battalion, with his best friend Fernando Escobar, that was showcased on the underground hip hop scene all over California. He and Leroy Moore got connected as the Krip-Hop Nation was taking off, and his work is on Krip-Hop Nation CD’s Vol’s 1, 2 and 3, Police Brutality Profiling, and Krip-Hop Nation’s 10 year anniversary album.

Toni Alika Hickman is not only a talented singer-songwriter; she is the survivor of two brain aneurysms and a stroke. Using her voice and music to inspire others, she has been featured on the Deborah Duncan Show, Radio One, featured in Shape magazine and other publications throughout the world. She has spoken at numerous colleges and other organizations on subjects of depression and recovery, physical, mental, and spiritual health, living one’s purpose, chemicals in beauty products, and a host of other subjects. She is a speaker/performer for YoungStroke and the American Heart Association, an author, artist, Certified Naturopath, mother, and activist, and Emmy Award winning artist for her role in the theme song for the Paralympics documentary Rising Phoenix. More at tonihickman.com.

* The line “The future lives in our bodies” is from the poem “Femme Futures” by Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha.

• Poetry Coalition program news at Publishers Weekly

#KripHopNation #DisabilityJustice #PoetryCoalition

Prose at The Poetry Center: Matthew Clark Davison, Stacy D. Flood, and Patrick Earl Ryan

  • This program also available via live-stream and at the same link after the event.

Supported by the National Endowment for the Arts

Join us at The Poetry Center (or tune in via live-stream) for this in-person reading and conversation with three friends and SF State alums. Matthew Clark Davison, Stacy D. Flood, and Patrick Earl Ryan will each be presenting their newly published fiction, and talking with each other and the audience. 

  • Please note: proof of vaccination and mask are required in order to attend in person.

Matthew Clark Davison is the author of Doubting Thomas (Amble Press, 2021). He is creator and teacher of The Lab :: Writing Classes with MCD, a non-academic school started in 2007 in a friend's living room on Douglass Street. The textbook version of The Lab, co-authored by bestselling writer Alice LaPlante, will be published by Norton in 2022. His prose has been published in or on BOMB, LitHub, Lambda Literary, The Advocate, Exquisite Pandemic, Guernica, The Atlantic Monthly, Foglifter, Lumina Magazine, and others; and has been recognized with a Creative Work Grant, Cultural Equities Grant, Clark Gross Award for a Novel-in-Progress, and a Stonewall Alumni Award. He earned a BA and MFA in Creative Writing from SFSU, where he now teaches full-time in the BA/MA/MFA departments.

Stacy D. Flood, originally from Buffalo, and currently living in Seattle, has had his work published nationally, and performed on stages nationwide as well as in the Puget Sound Area. He has been an artist-in-residence at DISQUIET in Lisbon, as well as Millay Arts in New York, and he is the recipient of a Getty Fellowship to the Community of Writers. Published in 2021 by Lanternfish Press, The Salt Fields is his first novella.

Patrick Earl Ryan was born and raised in New Orleans, Louisiana, in a family spanning 5 continents and 7 generations in the city. His debut short story collection If We Were Electric was chosen by Roxane Gay as the winner of the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction and published in 2020 by University of Georgia Press. His stories have appeared in Ontario Review, Pleiades, Best New American Voices, Men on Men: Best New Gay Fiction for the Millennium, Cairn, James White Review, and Gertrude; and he was the founder and editor-in-chief of the LGBTQ+ literary journal Lodestar Quarterly. More here.

Chris Nealon and Stephanie Young, at East Bay Media Center

Supported by the Dorothy A. Fowler Trust

  • Video live-streamed to our YouTube channel. Media captioning available there after the event.

Join us as we welcome poets Chris Nealon—who'll be visiting the Bay Area to deliver The Poetry Center's annual George Oppen Memorial Lecture, the following evening (same time, same venue)—and Stephanie Young.

  • Like the space heroes of his childhood, Nealon does not give in to the Dark Side in his poetry, retreat into “low-level intra-bourgeois competitiveness,” intellectualism, narcissism, or fear. Nor does he engage in “apocalypse braggadocio,” setting up the poet as a hero of the breakdown.... The primary thing I feel reading Chris Nealon’s The Shore is gratitude. Gratitude that he exists as a writer and thinker, as a human. Gratitude to him for writing this book, whose resonances only deepen in a COVID-crisis world. —Allison Cobb, Lambda Literary Review
     
  • Stephanie’s work is wonderful, a kind of loping swirl full of pop references, half of which I don’t understand. But that doesn’t matter because the knit is strong material yet loose, leaving lots of space, through which a sense of reality floats and stays with me. In an age of con and artifice, I want this. —Judy Grahn

Chris Nealon is a Professor of English at Johns Hopkins University. He is the author of The Shore (Wave Books, 2020) as well as two books of literary criticism, Foundlings: Lesbian and Gay Historical Emotion before Stonewall (Duke, 2001) and The Matter of Capital: Poetry and Crisis in The American Century (Harvard, 2011), as well as three earlier books of poetry: The Joyous Age (Black Square Editions, 2004), Plummet (Edge Books, 2009), and Heteronomy (Edge, 2014). He lives in Washington, DC.

Stephanie Young lives and works in Oakland. Her books of poetry and prose include It’s No Good Everything’s Bad, Ursula or University, Picture Palace, and Telling the Future Off. Her latest book of poetry is Pet Sounds (Nightboat Books, 2019). She edited the anthology Bay Poetics, and with Juliana Spahr, A Megaphone: Some Enactments, Some Numbers, and Some Essays about the Continued Usefulness of Crotchless-pants-and-a-machine-gun Feminism. Young is a member of the Krupskaya Books editorial collective.

Related event:
Chris Nealon, The George Oppen Memorial Lecture: "George Oppen and the Future"

Event contact: 

The Poetry Center

Event phone: 

(415) 338-2227

Event sponsor: 

The Poetry Center

Chris Nealon, “George Oppen and The Future”: The George Oppen Memorial Lecture

Introduced by Brandon Brown

The George Oppen Memorial Lecture is supported by the Dorothy A. Fowler Trust.

  • Video live-streamed to our YouTube channel. Media captioning available there after the event.

We are delighted to host poet and scholar Chris Nealon to deliver the 36th annual George Oppen Memorial Lecture. Nealon's subject will be "George Oppen and the Future." Brandon Brown will introduce Nealon, with the event supported by the Dorothy A. Fowler Trust.

…Look around you now        and ask yourself

Which of these—

                The innovators, profit-makers, the ones behind high walls,

                                The ones who are planning for the great catastrophes—

                Or the ones with no ability to plan,

                Who live from hour to hour, year to year,

                                In whom terror waits to be uncurdled,

                Who live in the great wide world—

Which of these will be the victorious ones?

Nobody knows.

—Chris Nealon, from “The Victorious Ones”

Chris Nealon is a Professor of English at Johns Hopkins University. He is the author of The Shore (Wave Books, 2020) as well as two books of literary criticism, Foundlings: Lesbian and Gay Historical Emotion before Stonewall (Duke, 2001) and The Matter of Capital: Poetry and Crisis in The American Century (Harvard, 2011), as well as three earlier books of poetry: The Joyous Age (Black Square Editions, 2004), Plummet (Edge Books, 2009), and Heteronomy (Edge, 2014). He lives in Washington, DC.

Related event:

Chris Nealon and Stephanie Young, reading and in conversation

Recent Oppen Lectures:

Erica Hunt, The George Oppen Memorial Lecture: December 12, 2020

Tyrone Williams, The George Oppen Memorial Lecture: December 6, 2019

David Hobbs, The George Oppen Memorial Lecture: December 2, 2017

Frances Richard, The George Oppen Memorial Lecture: December 17, 2016

Roberto Tejada, The George Oppen Memorial Lecture: December 12, 2015

George Oppen at The Poetry Center:

Charles Reznikoff and George Oppen: February 19, 1963

George Oppen: February 21, 1968

George Oppen: October 29, 1969

Event contact: 

The Poetry Center

Event phone: 

(415) 338-2227

Event sponsor: 

The Poetry Center